Finding the right domains

There are many domain investors that wish they could go back to the 90’s. Why wish for the 90’s? You can buy the right domains now to make a profit in the future. Set aside some time to look for good domain names. How do you find the right domain names?

I look at many factors in a domain name. I usually target the CPC. Education, law, credit, debt, medical, and loans tend to have the highest CPC. Another factor is the language of a domain. I try to keep the name as generic as possible without adding anything irrelevant to the domain name.

There are many domains out there that have words like the “greatest” “big” and other such headliners. I wouldn’t mind owning bigtickets.com or greatesthits.com. However, many domain investors overuse the words.

Pay special attention to the .us extensions. There are many unregistered .us names that hold nice appraisal value. I found some that are salable even before registering them. I used to register many .us domain names, but I never could make a sale.

Recently, one of my .us domains was pushed into an auction. I was surprised to see the name in an auction, considering that most auctions in the past denied nearly 100 of my domains. Since then, I learned how to buy the right domains. I’m confident that I bought the right domains before.

I purchased many domains that others passed up on before. But these same people are now looking to buy the domains. I find it kind of strange that domain sales occur at different times of the month.

There was a moment in time where it took me 3 months to make a sale. Now my technique is much better. Mostly all the sales took place at the end of the month. The right domains are sitting unregistered in a domain company. You have to be creative with a domain name.

I recently registered a few one word domains that are popular in their field. I wouldn’t say they’re valuable, but they have the potential to generate major interest in the near future. On the other hand, I have a few dozens domain names that can easily produce a sale.

It’s best to buy two word domains. Find a popular field. Pick words that fit together, and have a decent appraisal value. Use Valuate or Estibot to generate keyword stat results. Don’t look too much at the appraisal value. The domain may either word under valued or over valued.

What really matters is the market. Who do you think will be interested in the domain name.? Will a company want to acquire the domain to forward traffic or to develop a mini site? A few 3 digit .co and .org domains are sitting around in the unregistered pile.

When you register new domain names, use a business frame of mind. While writing this post, I found two .com domains that appraise for more than $500. These are highly popular domain names that people overlooked.

These domain names target a specific product. Every time you make a sale, try to invest the money back into acquiring more domains. If you’re offered $50 for a domain name, consider taking that amount if the name has little market value.

Use the search engine to help you search for domain names. Remember; think like a business, and don’t focus too much on the appraisal value. There are many factors such as keyword results and popular searches that help to determine the overall value of a domain name.

Try your best to locate two word domains. If you’re looking for long-tailed domains, choose ones that target education. “Online” as part of any domain name will generate nice CPC, that is if the service is popular online.

Good luck on your search.

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The value of having the .com

When I first started domaining, I purchased many .com domains that made up key phrases or that targeted the New York City brand.

Many websites tricked me into buying .us and .net domains. I assumed that since these domains generated high appraisal value, that people would actually buy them. However, I was never successful with making a sale.

I managed to sell domains that I bought before I knew about the importance of keywords. These domains fetched some good prices.

I wasted too much time trying to buy various extentions beyond the .com. I once purchased an abundance of hyphenated NYC brand domains because one appraisal system overstated their value.

I even purchased reversed order donains. This occured due to an industry leading domain company having an ineffective price suggestion system.

I read many blogs and asked a ton of questions. One highly respected domain owner took the time to review my domain portfolio.

He told me that I needed to but better names, and they should be .com names unless .net and others extensions were too good to pass up.

I did happen to change my approach to think like a business. I asked myself what names would a business want?

Essentially, I went after city hotel names, apartments, rentals, and restaurants. I purchased different variations of city names, and so forth.

I bought hiking domains, whitewater rafting domains and nature-related domains. My collection continued to grow. I now feel much more confident about domain investors. I know how to operate as a domain investor and as a domain flipper.

I made many mistakes with buying some names, but I’m glad I did because I located various names that I sold to various companies.

You never know which names will generate a quick sale and which ones may take a few years to build into something big.

When it comes to .com domains, make sure you find the best ones out in your hometown. Always look to purchase the .com. Anthony regarding community services, cities and education make good .org domains.

I tried so hard to sell the .net domains, but none of then garnished any attention. I sat into several offices with no such luck.

The .com is always an easy sale. If I owned the .com version, I would have sold the domain name on the spot.

You have to look at the .com from the perspective that it’s the most popular and respected extension. If you want to invest in your city, buy the .com and .org extension, whereas .net and .info ate good as a national and an international brand.

For example, coupons.info is a great domain to forward traffic to a coupon that provides the same exact service. Autocollisionrepair.net will likely work to generate traffic to a collision repair center.

Anything other than the .com works well for 3 character, exact generic names, widespread brands such as bikinis.net, paydayloans.net and other products and services that are popular.

If you live in a small city, buy only the .com. You can buy different variations of the .org for your city name. I’m telling you this right now because .net is a tough sale. The .us is also another challenge.

If you an I-Phone, you can type in a name without the extension, which will automatically go to the .com. There’s a .com key on the phone, as well.

Most people looking for an exact hotel may use their favorite brand, search across the net using search engines and type in the (city name)hotels.com. Companies that own these names are able to use these names to build traffic.

Purchasing good domain names is much cheaper than advertising. The Internet is the wave of the future. Good domain names are going to be much harder to find.

I know that i’ve come a long way. I used to make a list of all the domains I planned to buy and ones that I previously purchased or passes up on. People would buy the domains I elected not to purchase, demonstrating that I know what areas were popular.

Now I’m looking for the high profile names. When I arrive at Frank Schilling’s sales page, I know that I’m thinking like a business person.

Frank owns VacavilleHotels.com. I own VacavilleCAhotels.com. He owns BayAreaRap.com. I own BayAreaRapScene.com.

While Frank may have purchased many of these names several years ago, I’m still finding good variations which are sitting around unclaimed. What I’m suggesting is to research different variations.

I will never own Suisun.com, but I do happen to have Suisun.org, Suisun.biz, Suisun.co, CityofSuisun.com and many other good names. I never let a good domain name prevent me from finding another variation.

There are endless possibilities out in the world of domains. Domain names are like ideas. People are always writing new books, scripts, films, and investing new products. That goes to show that names are readily available.

You might have to sit up late at night trying to find names, but it’s well worth the time and investment.

I might have many mistakes with purchasing reverse order domains and investing too heavily in NYC, however I’m glad I did because many of my sales came from those regions.

You never learn until you make a mistake. Learning is the key to becoming successful. Buy the .com in small cities, and go after the lesser extentions in a bigger market.

I found QueensHotels.net. I’m sure I’ll be able to sell that domain in the next 6 months. Don’t pass up on the .net in large markets such as NYC and any product or service across the globe.

Education, loans, credit, health treatment, debt, property, law and other popular areas demand wide attention. Try your best to invest in the .com.

Domains up for Sale at a Fraction of their Appraisal

Domain Name BIN Reserve Listing Date Listing Duration Auction Duration
DirtyJobs.us $550 $210 7/24/2010 30 days 5 days
CustodianJobs.us $350 $140 7/24/2010 30 days 5 days
HauntedPlaces.us $300 $120 7/24/2010 30 days 5 days
Elitist.us $270 $110 7/24/2010 30 days 5 days
EpaGrants.com $240 $90 7/24/2010 30 days 5 days
SfMuseums.net $230 $90 7/24/2010 30 days 5 days
TherapistJobs.us $230 $90 7/24/2010 30 days 5 days
PetJobs.net $210 $80 7/24/2010 30 days 5 days
SolanoCounty.us $170 $60 7/24/2010 30 days 5 days
Adjusted.us $170 $60 7/24/2010 30 days 5 days
CoastGulf.com $160 $60 7/24/2010 30 days 5 days
FrostyTheSnowman.us $160 $60 7/24/2010 30 days 5 days
SpamTools.us $150 $60 7/24/2010 30 days 5 days
Multidimensional.us $110 $50 7/24/2010 30 days 5 days
JournalismPhoto.com $110 $50 7/24/2010 30 days 5 days
BeachMiami.info $110 $50 7/24/2010 30 days 5 days
LaMuseum.net $100 $50 7/24/2010 30 days 5 days
LibertyInsurance.info $90 $50 7/24/2010 30 days 5 days
ScentedCondoms.com $90 $50 7/24/2010 30 days 5 days
AnimationModels.com $80 $50 7/24/2010 30 days 5 days
CableCar.mobi $70 $50 7/24/2010 30 days 5 days

Bargain Domains

Spelling long tailed domains

In the domain industry, spelling can mean the difference between owning a valuable domain or being stuck with a worthless domain.

Several months ago I purchased hundreds of domains. One domain, in particular, was targeted toward Niagara Falls.

I thought that I found the perfect domain. Recently, I discovered that I spelled Niagra Falls wrong.

The domain niagrafallsNY.org contained a very minor mispelling. Instead of spelling the domain niagarafallsNY.org, I made the mistake of spelling the domain name as niagrafallsNY.org.

The domain appraises for $330. However, the right spelling is the difference between owning a $1500-2000 and a $330 domain.

Luckily the domain was already registered several years ago. The midsake was minor, which is a common spelling error.

You have to be very careful with spelling long tailed domains. One mistake can definitely ruin a long-term investment. I recently purchased several long tailed domains targeting my graduate program.

Essentially, I plan to cover the entire graduate in its entirety. Students will have the opportunity to visit the websites to locate information.

I double-checked the long tailed domains for spellling. My main goal was to find name variations that generate high CPC competition rates. Some registered CPC rates as high as $16.

Even the medical domains produced extremely high CPC rates. One of the domains produced a $26.50 CPC rate. However, the domain appraised for only $5. The keywords are commonly referenced in Google.

Surely enough, I’m confident that I can make a nice income with the domain. Always check your spelling to ensure spelling accuracy.

When you resale the domain to an end-user and or another domain investor, one muspelled word in a long tailed domain will likely compromise its value.

To be sure, copy and past the domain name into Google. Place parenthesis around the keywords to find the exact keywords used in conjunction with the content.

It’s very easy to make spelling mistakes. Catch these mistakes before submitting the domain name for registration. Making one spelling error will easily ruin the long-term value of a domain name. Good luck!

Bought QRT.co

3 character domains are hard to find. I have tried many times to look for good 3 character domains.

Yesterday I located two .co 3 character domains, but only registered the better of the two. After searching for 10 minutes, I located QRT.co.

The domain’s initials represents a government term known as “Quick Response Time.” As a writer, there are many ways to use this domain.

I’m definitely lucky to locate a nice 3 character .co.

Another newly registered domain receives a high bid

Today I found another domain that was only registered this past March. The domain received a $1000 bid.

The domain is valued at less than $50. It doesn’t produce any stats. Most of my domains are set at a fixed price. Sedo recommends a fix price, noting that domains sell three to four times faster.

Since I uploaded a domain at Sedo, I have never sold a domain at a fixed price, unless I provided a link to the domain.

It puzzles me that a domains based on speculation are fetching 4 figure prices.

I own hundreds of domains which can sell for 4 figures. Many of these are extremely popular keywords. I have never sold any domains above $320.

There has to be some sort of technique to find a bidder. I have over 400 domains listed at Sedo.

Sedo suggests that setting fixed prices are the fastest way to make a sale. In my opinion, setting fixed prices are the worst way to sell a domain. It’s much more easier to ask have interest people to make an offer. I use the “make an offer” technique when I craft e-mails to push a domain.

Furthermore, domain owners should always communicate the advantages in using a domain. In order to make a sale, you have to build value into the domain.

Pay attention to Sedo and Go Daddy auctions. Keep track of what the new owner does with the domain. Are these domains used to forward traffic or developed into websites?

The best advice I can offer is to find domain names that you would purchase if you owned a business in that particular market. I assure you that there are thousands of unregistered domains that are still available.

Good luck.

Why some domains produce a sale

I read various blogs and look at what domain investors and companies are bidding on. On Sedo, I came across climatepredicitons.org. This domain barely produces any stats, if not any at all. The domain is about two years old. Guess what?

The owner was able to find someone to make them an offer at $1600+ on the domain, Its puzzling to me how a domain that is not even worth 5% of that value receives a bid for that amount. The owner barely put any work in describing the domain.

It’s another one of those situations where less work produces double the results. I write a ton just to convince a buyer to pay 20% of the amount this owner is receiving on a domain that has no relevant searches. In Google, the domain produces only 500,000 results.

When this domain is typed into an appraisal system, it pulls up as being worth $75.  There has to be some kind of strategy to finding a buyer to pay over 20 times the value for a domain that is based on speculation.

The domain has no traffic ranking and no Google Page rank. Furthermore, the domain is parked at Sedo, offering no content. To ask $1600+ based on speculation is far too much for this domain.

I have to call companies, write hundreds of e-mails, and set up meetings to make pocket change. Some of these domains owners at Sedo are making a fortune with putting in no work. I never understand how some domains produce a sale, especially when they lack content.

I’m thinking that producing a sale is based on luck. Some people have a better chance to make a sale, while others must put in a ton of work to generate little results. I won’t let a domain such as the one selling for $1600+ keep me from duplicating the same exact results.

There has to be a way to receive an offer on one of my 500 domains, which I can then push the domain into the marketplace auction. I assure you that there are many domains in the auction that are less appealing than what I own now.

Maybe I can generate some interest on trafficfines.org. TrafficFines.org generates far better results, as compared to the domain that has a current $1600 bid. I’m assuming that it takes luck to be offered 20 times the value of what a domain is actually worth.

Another strategy that one can use is to contact the new owner regarding a similar domain you want to offer them. Ask them to make you a reasonable offer, and continue to follow-up with them until the deal closes.

Persistence is the key to making every sale a success.