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Finding the right domains

There are many domain investors that wish they could go back to the 90’s. Why wish for the 90’s? You can buy the right domains now to make a profit in the future. Set aside some time to look for good domain names. How do you find the right domain names?

I look at many factors in a domain name. I usually target the CPC. Education, law, credit, debt, medical, and loans tend to have the highest CPC. Another factor is the language of a domain. I try to keep the name as generic as possible without adding anything irrelevant to the domain name.

There are many domains out there that have words like the “greatest” “big” and other such headliners. I wouldn’t mind owning bigtickets.com or greatesthits.com. However, many domain investors overuse the words.

Pay special attention to the .us extensions. There are many unregistered .us names that hold nice appraisal value. I found some that are salable even before registering them. I used to register many .us domain names, but I never could make a sale.

Recently, one of my .us domains was pushed into an auction. I was surprised to see the name in an auction, considering that most auctions in the past denied nearly 100 of my domains. Since then, I learned how to buy the right domains. I’m confident that I bought the right domains before.

I purchased many domains that others passed up on before. But these same people are now looking to buy the domains. I find it kind of strange that domain sales occur at different times of the month.

There was a moment in time where it took me 3 months to make a sale. Now my technique is much better. Mostly all the sales took place at the end of the month. The right domains are sitting unregistered in a domain company. You have to be creative with a domain name.

I recently registered a few one word domains that are popular in their field. I wouldn’t say they’re valuable, but they have the potential to generate major interest in the near future. On the other hand, I have a few dozens domain names that can easily produce a sale.

It’s best to buy two word domains. Find a popular field. Pick words that fit together, and have a decent appraisal value. Use Valuate or Estibot to generate keyword stat results. Don’t look too much at the appraisal value. The domain may either word under valued or over valued.

What really matters is the market. Who do you think will be interested in the domain name.? Will a company want to acquire the domain to forward traffic or to develop a mini site? A few 3 digit .co and .org domains are sitting around in the unregistered pile.

When you register new domain names, use a business frame of mind. While writing this post, I found two .com domains that appraise for more than $500. These are highly popular domain names that people overlooked.

These domain names target a specific product. Every time you make a sale, try to invest the money back into acquiring more domains. If you’re offered $50 for a domain name, consider taking that amount if the name has little market value.

Use the search engine to help you search for domain names. Remember; think like a business, and don’t focus too much on the appraisal value. There are many factors such as keyword results and popular searches that help to determine the overall value of a domain name.

Try your best to locate two word domains. If you’re looking for long-tailed domains, choose ones that target education. “Online” as part of any domain name will generate nice CPC, that is if the service is popular online.

Good luck on your search.

Domains up for Sale at a Fraction of their Appraisal

Domain Name BIN Reserve Listing Date Listing Duration Auction Duration
DirtyJobs.us $550 $210 7/24/2010 30 days 5 days
CustodianJobs.us $350 $140 7/24/2010 30 days 5 days
HauntedPlaces.us $300 $120 7/24/2010 30 days 5 days
Elitist.us $270 $110 7/24/2010 30 days 5 days
EpaGrants.com $240 $90 7/24/2010 30 days 5 days
SfMuseums.net $230 $90 7/24/2010 30 days 5 days
TherapistJobs.us $230 $90 7/24/2010 30 days 5 days
PetJobs.net $210 $80 7/24/2010 30 days 5 days
SolanoCounty.us $170 $60 7/24/2010 30 days 5 days
Adjusted.us $170 $60 7/24/2010 30 days 5 days
CoastGulf.com $160 $60 7/24/2010 30 days 5 days
FrostyTheSnowman.us $160 $60 7/24/2010 30 days 5 days
SpamTools.us $150 $60 7/24/2010 30 days 5 days
Multidimensional.us $110 $50 7/24/2010 30 days 5 days
JournalismPhoto.com $110 $50 7/24/2010 30 days 5 days
BeachMiami.info $110 $50 7/24/2010 30 days 5 days
LaMuseum.net $100 $50 7/24/2010 30 days 5 days
LibertyInsurance.info $90 $50 7/24/2010 30 days 5 days
ScentedCondoms.com $90 $50 7/24/2010 30 days 5 days
AnimationModels.com $80 $50 7/24/2010 30 days 5 days
CableCar.mobi $70 $50 7/24/2010 30 days 5 days

Bargain Domains

Elite Domain Investors as Elitists

I usually look to Domaining.com’s newsletter for information on domain investing. I spend a great deal of time researching important domain tips to aid me in acquiring new domains.

I won’t name any domain blog owners, but I have come across a few that seem to treat me with less respect than I return to them.

It really frustrates me, especially when I have provided thoughtful content to aid them in writing their articles. After I write posts, I noticed that what I write tends to inspire the next article. This has happened at least a few times.

In the academic world, this process would be known as plagiarism. In the domain industry, blog owners depend on their fans to inspire their work.

I mentioned Alexa traffic, chatroulette, and a few other references in my comments. I don’t mind when my ideas ate used to write articles.

However, I dislike the way I’m treated when I leave comments. The blog owner has decided to deny my comments. They even accused me of spamming, which I found to be an insult.

I don’t need to spam to get results. I’m confident about my domain investing approach. I managed to make a few sales based on the techniques offered in this blog. I gave credit to the blog owner for inspiring me to become a better domain investor.

For the most part, I adjusted the blog owner’s selling strategy to generate interest. After the blog owner rejected my recent posts, I decided my time is better spent writing on Domain Madness.

I refuse to be treated like I’m a kid. I have spent many long nights researching the domain industry. While I may lack the funds to purchase high profile domain names, I do happen to come across some nice unregistered domain ls.

I understand how the domain industry works in regards to the search engine and end-user demand. There’s always a new tip that opens me to new opportunities within the domain industry.

I don’t dislike the blog owner. He has taught me to become a better domain investor. He changed his perspective about helping me. I no longer need the coaching to choose good domain names.

Another domain leader took the l time out of their busy schedule to coach me on how to choose good domain names. They told me to focus on registering .com domain names. He noted that I should target businesses.

Because of this domain leader, I have learned to choose good domain names. On the contrary, I registered good domain names in the past. I sold a handful of domain names that I sold to end-users. These were domains that targeted specific businesses.

Beside these two domain leaders, I have found it hard to receive any respondes from any other domain investors.

I owe my short-term domain investing success to Domaining.com, and the two domain leaders that made it possible for me to succeed.

Are many elite domain investors trying to keep others from suceeding? It sure seems that way. They try to avoid sharing various selling tips and buying tips. There’s always going to be competition in every industry.

I hope to become a better domain investor. I want to help newcomers learn about the domain industry. Domaining is definitely an interesting hobby that requires a lot of work.

In essence, elite domain leaders are sometimes secretive about their techniques because maybe sharing too much information will compromise their strategy.

Have you ever experienced a issue with an elite domain investor? Share your thoughts.

A CNN article about the domaining legends

If you want proof that domain investing is profitable, then read the following article written in 2005. CNNMoney.com wrote a great article on the power of domain investing, and how it made a few prominent domain investors multimillionaires.

Domain investing, if done right, can transform a meager life into a fantasy. Who would imagine that domain names could fetch millions of dollars? The domain pioneers knew exactly how to snatch up the best domain names to make a huge profit on ad revenue and reselling them to businesses.

Elite domain investors formed relationships with Yahoo and Google, making it lucrative for them to feature ads on their domains. Essentially, sponsors paid the two elite search engine companies to increase their web presence, helping to build traffic to their business.

Many high profile domains produced large results due to search window type-ins using a specific keyword such as homes.com. While most web users visit popular search engines, there are others who type-in a specific name with a .com after it.

For the most part, adult websites, loans, homes, investments, and sports domains capitalize off the traffic. I urge you to read the article because it gives one a glimpse of the domain industry from 2005. I purchased a few domains in 2004, but neer even considered them to be valuable.

My mother told me to invest into the company industry back in 1994, but I never listened to her. Instead, I chose to go after my Hollywood goals. But now, I find myself returning to my mother’s advice; computer programming, animation and domains are the wave of the future.

Listen to good advice to save yourself stress. Please check out the article on the “Masters of their Domain.” Awesome piece!

If you want proof that domain investing is profitable, then read the following article written in 2005. CNNMoney.com wrote a great article on the power of domain investing, and how it made a few prominent domain investors multimillionaires.

Domain investing, if done right, can transform a meager life into a fantasy. Who would imagine that domain names could fetch millions of dollars? The domain pioneers knew exactly how to snatch up the best domain names to make a huge profit on ad revenue.

Elite domain investors formed relationships with Yahoo and Google, making it lucrative for them to feature ads on their domains. Essentially, sponsors paid the two elite search engine companies to increase their web presence, helping to build traffic to their business.

Many high profile domains produced large results due to search window type-ins using a specific keyword such as homes.com. While most web users visit popular search engines, there are others who type-in a specific name with a .com after it.

For the most part, adult websites, loans, homes, investments, and sports domains capitalize off the traffic. I urge you to read the article because it gives one a glimpse of the domain industry from 2005. I purchased a few domains in 2004, but neer even considered them to be valuable.

My mother told me to invest into the computer industry back in 1994, but I never listened to her. Instead, I chose to go after my Hollywood goals. But now, I find myself returning to my mother’s advice; computer programming, animation and domains are the wave of the future.

Listen to good advice to save yourself stress. Please check out the article on the “Masters of their Domain.” Awesome piece!

http://money.cnn.com/magazines/business2/business2_archive/2005/12/01/8364591/

I don’t usually ask others to help me, but….

I own hundreds of domains. I listed a few up for sale on Domain Madness and Suisun Blog. I will need your help to make my graduation next weekend. I worked 3 years to earn my graduate degree.

While others may ask for donations, I’m looking to sell some of domains. Essentially, I’m offering an investment, as well as an acknowledgment of a good deed. In return, I will write an article to thank all those who help me on my blogs, and at a few of my hosted domains.

Please browse my inventory. I have other cool domains that are not listed on my blogs. Inquire within if you’re looking for a specific domain name. I haven’t give up yet on the graduation ceremony, but it is looking rather grim that I won’t be attending next Saturday, June 26.

I will appreciate any help that will lead me to my graduation. Thank you!

My domains are up for auction at Bargain Domains.

6/9/2010 30 No AirForceBase.co.uk $6,200 $620 $0 0
6/13/2010 30 No LoanJobs.net $6,000 $600 $0 0
5/26/2010 30 No VallartaPuerto.com $2,800 $280 $0 0
5/27/2010 30 No PastryChefJobs.net $2,700 $270 $0 0
5/24/2010 30 No DirtyJobs.us $2,100 $100 $0 0
5/19/2010 30 No AnimationPrograms.us $1,900 $90 $0 0
6/13/2010 30 No MagicPen.us $1,900 $190 $0 0
5/27/2010 30 No ProductionJobs.us $1,900 $190 $0 0
5/27/2010 30 No WhiteDiamond.us $1,700 $170 $0 0
5/27/2010 30 No TutKing.com $1,600 $160 $0 0
5/26/2010 30 No TrackingLight.com $1,500 $150 $0 0
5/26/2010 30 No GreenChalkboards.com $1,400 $140 $0 0
5/27/2010 30 No FitnessTrainerJobs.net $1,400 $140 $0 0
5/19/2010 30 No ManagerialAccounting.us $1,300 $60 $0 0
5/24/2010 30 No CustodianJobs.us $1,300 $60 $0 0
5/27/2010 30 No CakeDecorations.us $1,300 $130 $0 0
5/27/2010 30 No BusinessLeadership.us $1,200 $120 $0 0
5/27/2010 30 No GreyEarl.com $1,100 $110 $0 0
5/27/2010 30 No HarborPearl.net $910 $90 $0 0
5/27/2010 30 No PasadenaCa.info $750 $70 $0 0
5/27/2010 30 No TrackRecord.us $730 $70 $0 0
5/27/2010 30 No GraduateLoans.us $700 $70 $0 0
5/27/2010 30 No MediaInfluence.net $690 $60 $0 0
5/27/2010 30 No Troubleshoots.org $640 $60 $0 0
5/26/2010 30 No CharcoalSticks.com $630 $60 $0 0
5/27/2010 30 No ChapelSistine.com $570 $50 $0 0
5/27/2010 30 No CalGrants.net $510 $50 $0 0

Bargain Domains